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Creating new Styles in Microsoft Word

Word 2013 Styles pane

Microsoft Word Styles are the most basic building blocks in Word. One of the first things you’ll need to learn after you master the interface and basic formatting is using the Quick Styles listed on the Home tab. Often, though, the Quick Styles don’t contain a particular Style your document needs.

If the default Microsoft Word Styles don’t fully meet your needs (for example, you need one for block quotes), you can create a new one. There are a couple of different ways to do this. I’ll start with what I think is the easiest one first. Click here to learn how …

Guest Post @ Lawyerist: 3 Word Formatting Snafus … Solved!

A lot of Microsoft Word users (particularly those who are coming to Word from WordPerfect) tear their hair out over those seemingly unsolvable formatting issues. You know what I’m talking about: that really funky something that happens to your text that seems to defy logic, even considering you’re dealing with a software program.

Over at Lawyerist, I tackle three of those bugaboos: the horizontal line that suddenly appears in your text and that you can’t backspace over, pages that have large blank spaces at the bottom of them (despite the fact that you haven’t put a hard page break in there), and yellow (or blue or green or whatever) highlighted text that won’t go away no matter what you do.

If you’ve ever had one of these frustrating problems, click here for the solutions.

Guest Post @ Lawyerist: Fix Formatting Fast – Five Microsoft Word Tricks

When one of the comments to your guest post is, “I think I love you,” you know you’ve struck a nerve. That’s just part of the response I’ve gotten to my list of five little-known tricks for fixing misbehaving formatting in Microsoft Word.

Click here to find out how you, too, can alleviate your frustration even when you don’t have time to diagnose the problem.

Inserting a table of contents using styles

One of the things I’m on a rant about these days is loooooong documents.  Complicated documents, like 20+ page contracts and appellate briefs and stuff like that.

Why?  Because they always seem to need special stuff inserted in them.  Like custom headers and footers.  And level-1 and level-2 and level-out-the-wazoo headings.  It’s enough to make your head spin.

But if you’ve got mad skills and you plan your document right, a lot of this stuff becomes easier.  Like putting in a simple table of contents, for example.

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