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Weekly Roundup: Finding ‘Find’, 5 formatting shortcuts, and tricked-out TOCs

More tips from this week’s RSS feeds:

Finding where Microsoft Word 2010 buried Find — You know, I’m a little embarrassed I didn’t stumble across this first, but thankfully friend-of-this-blog Vivian Manning’s enlightened us all. You see, Microsoft couldn’t leave well enough alone and put the Find function (you know, this familiar dialog box below) …

… where it’s always been. They had to hijack my (and possibly your) beloved CTRL-F shortcut key to take us all to some Navigation Pane we’ve never seen before.

Vivian’s found our trusty Find box once again (it’s buried in the menu system, as she details in her post), but as you’ll see when you click through to the comments at the bottom of her post, that wasn’t good enough for me. I switched it back on my own Word 2010, and I left you illustrated instructions on how to do it yourself.

Five tips for lightning-fast formatting in Word — If you’re as big a shortcut key fan as I am, then you’ll love Susan Harkins’ assembly of the best formatting shortcut keys to memorize. Copy these down, post them near your desk, and use them often!

How to create one Table of Contents from multiple documents — I have to confess, I haven’t tried this yet, but I’m dying to. I didn’t know this was possible, and I’ll bet you didn’t either. Susan Harkins from TechRepublic (again!) gives us the skinny on using the RD function to drive this. She does admit that the master page numbering does take some fiddling, so try it on a dummy document before attempting it on a client project.

And for my U.S. readers, Happy Labor Day!

How to modify a Table of Contents in Microsoft Word

You’ve built a Table of Contents in Microsoft Word using the Styles feature to mark the TOC entries or by marking them manually. And just when you’re about to pat yourself on the back for having an automatic Table of Contents in your document, you notice something’s a little … off. Maybe the font’s not quite right. Or perhaps the font’s okay but the spacing’s not. Or the indentation. Or you want/don’t want the dot leaders running up to the page numbers.

Suffice it to say you just want to alter the format of it. But how?

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Inserting a table of contents using styles

One of the things I’m on a rant about these days is loooooong documents.  Complicated documents, like 20+ page contracts and appellate briefs and stuff like that.

Why?  Because they always seem to need special stuff inserted in them.  Like custom headers and footers.  And level-1 and level-2 and level-out-the-wazoo headings.  It’s enough to make your head spin.

But if you’ve got mad skills and you plan your document right, a lot of this stuff becomes easier.  Like putting in a simple table of contents, for example.

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