Tag Archives for " Appellate Briefs "

Guest Post @ Lawyerist: How to Format an Appellate Brief

If you’ve never had to tackle an appellate court brief, I envy you. (If you’ve ever had to do a U.S. Supreme Court brief, you have my sympathies.) As one commenter on my latest post on Lawyerist notes, sometimes formatting the stupid thing takes as much time as writing the substance of it.

But armed with my guide to formatting an appellate court brief, you can master the common elements that tend to pop up in most appellate courts’ requirements and spend less time formatting and more time writing.

Click here to read the full illustrated tutorial (including two short videos to show you how to do two of the most complex tasks: controlling page numbering and creating a template for future use) and learn why one commenter said she’s going to make this  “required reading” for all her 2Ls.

50 Using sections to control page numbers, headers and footers

Ever needed to be able to change the page numbers in the middle of a Microsoft Word document (an appellate brief, for example)?  Like, switching from Roman numerals to Arabic numerals or just not having page numbers at all?

Don’t tear your hair out, my pretty.  Help is here!

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5 Using Styles & Formatting

Got a long brief or other document that has lots of headings, subheadings, etc.?  You need Styles, baby.

No, not styleStyles.

The Styles function in Word is a handy tool for, among other things, setting up headings for different sections of a document.  These styles serve a dual purpose: not only do they help keep document formatting consistent (i.e., all paragraph and subparagraph headings at a particular level, for example, will be consistent through the document), they can help later when you create a Table of Contents, since Word can use these styles to create the levels of your Table of Contents.

There are a couple of different ways to use Styles & Formatting (as the feature is formally known) in your document.

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