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Every week, I’ll drop the 24 most popular Legal Office Guru posts into your inbox to help you do your job faster and easier. Like these:

  • Fixing funky text spacing in Word
  • Making your Outlook emails un-ignorable
  • Autonumbering discovery requests … in five keystrokes!
  • Using and formatting a Table of Authorities or Table of Contents
  • Setting tabs without tearing your hair out
  • Using Sections to customize headers, footers and page numbers

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Did you miss these Outlook tips on Attorney at Work and Lawyerist?

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If you’re not following my social media feeds on Twitter, LinkedIn or Google+, you might have missed a whole bunch of Outlook tips I’ve published recently at Attorney at Work and Lawyerist. Here are links to each article:

The 4 Most Dangerous Features in Outlook. Convenience can sometimes be dangerous, especially in a legal context. In this two-article series for Attorney at Work, I show you four features you need to either disable or (at least) use very, very carefully. Click here for Part 1 and click here for Part 2.

3 Microsoft Outlook Quick Tricks. Lawyerist recently re-published an article I did for them a while back about three Outlook features you probably didn’t know existed. Learn how to automatically organize emails into conversations for easier reading, how to re-direct email replies to your assistant or someone else, and how to get Outlook to calculate due dates by clicking here.

How to Fight Inbox Overload with Outlook. We’ve all got inboxes that are full to overflowing. In my newest post at Lawyerist, I’ve got a detailed, illustrated tutorial (with 22 screen shots!) on how to use Rules and Quick Steps to automatically deal with routine emails so you can concentrate on what’s critical. Click here to learn these time-saving techniques.

(photo credit: simiezzz via Flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/simiezzz/1070601182/)

The 4 Biggest Time-Saving Microsoft Word Features You’re Probably Not Using

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Learning Microsoft Word can seem a daunting task. So many features! Where’s the best place to start?

If you want to boost your productivity in Microsoft Word fast, you really need to master these four features first. Learning how to leverage these can shave seconds or even minutes off repetitive daily tasks, which adds up to getting more work done daily (or even leaving the office at a decent hour!).

Here are the four best areas for you to spend a little self-education time, before you’re subjected to one of those legal technology audits you keep hearing about.

Click here to find out what these features are …

7 Ways To Screw Up A Table of Authorities

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When I first got my Roku box a few years back, I spent an embarrassing amount of time binge-watching the dizzying array of streaming video I suddenly had access to. One of my early obsessions was a video series on Chow.com’s Roku channel called “You’re Doing It All Wrong“. (I do love me some food porn.) Thanks to that series, I now know what’s wrong with most people’s mashed potatoes (not boiled long enough), how to pan fry bacon properly (look for the bubbles), and why sushi chefs laugh at me (only noobs dunk the entire roll in soy sauce and then cram it in their faces with chopsticks).

I’m pretty sure the owners of Chow.com have the phrase “You’re Doing It All Wrong” trademarked or something; otherwise, I’d steal that phrase for an article series. And I know just where I’d start: Tables of Authorities.

Microsoft Word’s Table of Authorities feature isn’t exactly known for its user-friendliness. Nobody’s ever said the word “automagically” about it. And more than one enterprising software vendor has found a lucrative niche making an easier-to-use interface for TOAs.

I’ve had to use this feature myself on several occasions recently, and I’ve rediscovered seven ways you can easily (and thoroughly) screw up a Table of Authorities. (Need a TOA refresher course? Click here to learn how to mark citations, then click here for instructions on building the TOA itself.)

Click here to learn from my mistakes …

Reader Question: How to get footnote citations to show up in Table of Authorities

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Julie contacted me recently with a real puzzler:

I am working in Microsoft Word 2010.  For some reason when I am marking a citation, it will not include the case from a footnote in the Table of Authorities.  It will pick up a statute or rule, but not [a case from] the footnote.  Any suggestions??Julie

Ooooookaaaaay. Something’s really amiss here. And what made it more puzzling was, when I tried to replicate her problem on my own computer, mine worked just fine. (I actually kind of hate when that happens, because then I really feel stumped.)

Turns out, though, this a real problem that Microsoft knows about. Fortunately, it has a real solution.

Click here for details on the fix

Easy-to-read file folder labels for trial exhibits using Mail Merge

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One firm I’ve been working with has been in “trial mode” for a couple of weeks now. Thankfully, I wasn’t directly involved (I’ve seen the looks on the faces of the people who are, and I don’t want that), but I did pitch in where necessary. And “where necessary” included helping a secretary with making file folders for 100+ trial exhibits. The one requirement the paralegal had was the trial exhibit numbers had to be large and easy to read.

Thankfully, the trial exhibit list that was e-filed with the court was done in the form of a table. So that made it easy to use Mail Merge to create the labels, because we had a ready-to-use data source.

Click here to learn how to make “save the day” exhibit labels