Tag Archives for " Styles "

6

How To Add a Style to Quick Styles

Even those who have used Quick Styles frequently don’t know that there are lots more Styles available in Word. Getting one-click access to a Style, though, really requires that it be listed in the Quick Styles gallery (that list on the right-hand side of the Home tab).

If there’s a particular Style that you always want to be available within the Quick Styles gallery (especially one you just created for a particular purpose), here’s how to designate a Style as a Quick Style. Continue reading

6 Word 2013 Styles pane

Creating new Styles in Microsoft Word

Microsoft Word Styles are the most basic building blocks in Word. One of the first things you’ll need to learn after you master the interface and basic formatting is using the Quick Styles listed on the Home tab. Often, though, the Quick Styles don’t contain a particular Style your document needs.

If the default Microsoft Word Styles don’t fully meet your needs (for example, you need one for block quotes), you can create a new one. There are a couple of different ways to do this. I’ll start with what I think is the easiest one first. Continue reading

1 Work smarter not harder

The 4 Biggest Time-Saving Microsoft Word Features You’re Probably Not Using

Learning Microsoft Word can seem a daunting task. So many features! Where’s the best place to start?

If you want to boost your productivity in Microsoft Word fast, you really need to master these four features first. Learning how to leverage these can shave seconds or even minutes off repetitive daily tasks, which adds up to getting more work done daily (or even leaving the office at a decent hour!).

Here are the four best areas for you to spend a little self-education time, before you’re subjected to one of those legal technology audits you keep hearing about.

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5

How to create numbered headings using Styles

I seem to make my best discoveries about Microsoft Office when I’m annoyed. (See my last post, for example.) It’s that kind of annoyance that says, “There’s got to be a better way to do this.” For some reason or another, this time it was paragraph numbering. But not the normal kind where you have the paragraph number indented about half an inch on the same line with the start of the paragraph. The document I was working on (a will) had the paragraph number floating centered above the paragraph. While I was drafting the document, I just knew the attorney I was working for would be moving paragraphs all over the place, and I didn’t want to stop to renumber them when he did.

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This post won BlawgWorld’s Pick of the Week Award 3/10/14!
Click the image above for more details.

I remembered one of the paralegals I work with telling me that it was possible to embed numbers in Styles. So I went nosing around in Styles, looking to modify my Heading 1 so that it had an automatically incrementing Arabic numeral and a period, like so:

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Want to learn about Word Styles?

If you’ve read this blog (and especially my posts on Lawyerist) for very long, you know I’m very passionate about Styles. I’m convinced that Microsoft Word’s Styles is one of its most underutilized and unappreciated features. Learning how to use Styles is one of those skills that can exponentially increase your productivity and take your word processing work to a whole new level.

If you’re up for the challenge of learning Styles (and a closely related feature, Templates), I want to alert you to a resource you might consider. I’ve been a subscriber to the WordTips newsletter for a while now, and I’ve really been impressed by the breadth and depth of the tips this guy offers on his site and in his newsletter. I received an e-mail from him this morning, alerting me to his release of Word 2007 Styles and Templates and Word 2010 Styles and Templates. Although I haven’t had a chance to purchase these and review them myself, I wanted to go ahead and post links to these resources sooner rather than later because he’s offering these at half off through June 20. I’m definitely going to buy a copy for myself!

Click here for the 2007 version of this Styles and Templates resource, and click here for the 2010 version. Both of these are downloadable files (can you say “instant gratification”?).

(FTC Disclosure: These are not what are known as affiliate links. I have no association with WordTips and will receive no sales commission or any other compensation if you click those links. I’m just posting these because I happen to think this is probably a really good resource for anyone wanting to learn to use Styles.)

By the way, any of you who are still using the non-Ribbon versions of Word (2003 and earlier) should check out his Tips.net site. It’s a treasure trove of information on those older versions of Word. Click here to see what I mean!

63 The case of the shrunken comment balloon

And now for a dispatch from the “Well, I’ve never seen this before” Department … Just when I thought I had seen it all, my boss threw me a curve ball, courtesy of his new-found affection for Microsoft Word’s Track Changes feature.

He’s been using Track Changes a lot lately, and it’s turned out to be a pretty handy feature for him, since he’s been doing a lot of contract work. Marked-up documents have been flying back and forth via e-mail, and the Microsoft Word Track Changes feature has made life a lot easier for him.

Until last week, that is. He was getting ready to send out another reviewed document, when he opened it up from his outgoing e-mail and saw something like this:

Yikes! Who could possibly read that? That comment balloon is way too small!

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3 Guest post @ Lawyerist: Creating and Sharing Custom Microsoft Word Styles

As a follow-up to my Using Microsoft Word Styles post on Lawyerist, I go one step further and teach you how to create new Styles and share them with others in your office. If you’ve ever thought about creating a set of standard forms (pleadings, letters, etc.) for use by everyone in your workgroup or office, this post contains some critical information about how the interaction between Styles and Templates in Microsoft Word.

Click here for the full illustrated post.

1 Guest post @ Lawyerist: Using Microsoft Word Styles

Lawyerist editor-in-chief Sam Glover shot me an email from his crackberry a few weeks ago making a special request for my next guest post:

A primer on using styles, including how to create style sets and make them default.

How to move Normal.dot to a network drive or put it in your Dropbox so Word will use the same template across computers.

Typed on a small screen with my thumbs. Please excuse my brevity and typos.

So even though I already champion Styles usage for consistent formatting, particularly in long documents like briefs and contracts, I starting boning up, researching some more advanced techniques in my trusty Word 2010 reference.

Whoo, boy — what started out as “a primer on using styles” has morphed into a series. There’s a lot of untapped potential here, people, and I’m doing my darnedest to walk that fine line between delivering as much goodness as I can and keeping it simple enough to actually use.

Click here for the first post in the series. I’ve written post #2, so be on the lookout for even more advanced Styles techniques.

5

Inserting a table of contents using styles

One of the things I’m on a rant about these days is loooooong documents.  Complicated documents, like 20+ page contracts and appellate briefs and stuff like that.

Why?  Because they always seem to need special stuff inserted in them.  Like custom headers and footers.  And level-1 and level-2 and level-out-the-wazoo headings.  It’s enough to make your head spin.

But if you’ve got mad skills and you plan your document right, a lot of this stuff becomes easier.  Like putting in a simple table of contents, for example.

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5 Using Styles & Formatting

Got a long brief or other document that has lots of headings, subheadings, etc.?  You need Styles, baby.

No, not styleStyles.

The Styles function in Word is a handy tool for, among other things, setting up headings for different sections of a document.  These styles serve a dual purpose: not only do they help keep document formatting consistent (i.e., all paragraph and subparagraph headings at a particular level, for example, will be consistent through the document), they can help later when you create a Table of Contents, since Word can use these styles to create the levels of your Table of Contents.

There are a couple of different ways to use Styles & Formatting (as the feature is formally known) in your document.

Continue reading