Category Archives for "Word 2007"

Guest Post @ Lawyerist: Get Reveal Codes in Microsoft Word with CrossEyes

Hands-down, the number one complaint I get from former WordPerfect users is, “But Word doesn’t have Reveal Codes!” And, to a point, that’s true.

But as my ongoing (really, never-ending) research in the wonderful world of Microsoft Office plug-ins (a.k.a. add-ins or extensions) has shown me, it’s often a case of “seek and ye shall find.” Because there are a lot of enterprising programmers out there adding heretofore unavailable features to Microsoft Office.

Specifically, for Reveal Codes, there’s CrossEyes. And if you want to get a gander at what this plug-in can do, click here to read my review on Lawyerist.

15 Printing Envelopes and Labels, Part 2: Labels

As I mentioned in the previous post on Envelopes, even though formatting and printing envelopes and labels is a really basic word processing function, Microsoft Word inexplicably hides it from users on the Mailings tab.

Fortunately, if you're using labels from a major label vendor like Avery, you don't have to bust out the ruler and define the label format from scratch. But knowing how to choose which label format to use can be a bit tricky.

Keep reading →

Guest Post @ Lawyerist: Taming Microsoft Word’s Autoformat As You Type

While I’m a big fan of smart software, I don’t like when software tries to out-think me (and does a bad job of it). That’s why I’m not an especially big fan of Microsoft Word’s AutoFormat As You Type feature.

If you’re not familiar with this feature, it’s the one that turns “1/2” into “½” and does various other “oh, let me re-do that for you” functions that can get in the way, particularly if you’re a speed typist and not exactly the world’s best proofreader.

In my latest guest post at Lawyerist, I show you how to find this feature’s control panel and disable any part of it you’re having problems with.

Click here to read the full post.

Guest Post @ Lawyerist: Using Microsoft Word’s Table of Authorities

I received a special request from a reader for my latest post on Lawyerist for a post on how to do a Table of Authorities in Microsoft Word. Although I’d covered the subject in depth with a post on marking citations here and generating the Table of Authorities here (with another post based on a suggestion from a reader here), I was happy to write up a more concise set of instructions for the Lawyerist crowd. One subject I address there that I did not in my own blog is the plugins that are available to make Microsoft Word’s Table of Authorities feature a lot easier to deal with, since it’s one of the most problematic features in Word.

Click here to read the full post.

24 Reader Question: Getting rid of hard line breaks in pasted text

Reader Benjamin e-mailed me recently from my Ask the Guru page with this request:

I’ve got text (imported badly – I don’t have access to the original source) which is spaced badly in Microsoft Word 2010 — meaning I have to manually cursor + delete then space-bar to put it back together without the green wiggles.It’s time consuming and I would like to know if there is an automated alternative.

I’m sure I’m one of millions who are suffering with this. Can you help us?Benjamin

He attached a Screenr video demonstrating his problem, which immediately made clear what he was up against:

When he says he’s “one of millions who are suffering with this,” I believe him. Because I’m one of them, too. And between the two of us, we might’ve come up with a good solution.

Keep reading →

Guest Post @ Lawyerist: Using Microsoft Word to Edit by Committee

Ever experienced “death by redlining”? You know what I mean. It’s that headache-inducing series of emails in which you and your colleagues send seemingly endless drafts of the document  du jour back-and-forth, ad infinitum.

While I can’t do anything about those unreasonable people who don’t like the way you phrased something or other, I can help you make up for their lack of skill with Microsoft Word. Click here to read the full article before your next “editing by committee” session, and you’ll be prepared to deal with other people’s bad formatting without tearing your own hair out.

13 How to keep two words together on a single line

Remember typewriters? (Those of you too young to remember those, just skip this part. Please.) Every time you heard that little ding when you approached the right-hand margin, you knew you needed to reach up, hit that bar over on the left side, and return the platen to the left margin to start a new line.

Yes, it was a pain in the neck compared to typing on a word processor. But at least then you had total control over where the line break was. These days? Not so much.

But you can still stop awkward breaks — hyphenated words or other groups of words that need to appear together on a single line — with a quick three-key combination.

Keep reading →

Want to learn about Word Styles?

If you’ve read this blog (and especially my posts on Lawyerist) for very long, you know I’m very passionate about Styles. I’m convinced that Microsoft Word’s Styles is one of its most underutilized and unappreciated features. Learning how to use Styles is one of those skills that can exponentially increase your productivity and take your word processing work to a whole new level.

If you’re up for the challenge of learning Styles (and a closely related feature, Templates), I want to alert you to a resource you might consider. I’ve been a subscriber to the WordTips newsletter for a while now, and I’ve really been impressed by the breadth and depth of the tips this guy offers on his site and in his newsletter. I received an e-mail from him this morning, alerting me to his release of Word 2007 Styles and Templates and Word 2010 Styles and Templates. Although I haven’t had a chance to purchase these and review them myself, I wanted to go ahead and post links to these resources sooner rather than later because he’s offering these at half off through June 20. I’m definitely going to buy a copy for myself!

Click here for the 2007 version of this Styles and Templates resource, and click here for the 2010 version. Both of these are downloadable files (can you say “instant gratification”?).

(FTC Disclosure: These are not what are known as affiliate links. I have no association with WordTips and will receive no sales commission or any other compensation if you click those links. I’m just posting these because I happen to think this is probably a really good resource for anyone wanting to learn to use Styles.)

By the way, any of you who are still using the non-Ribbon versions of Word (2003 and earlier) should check out his Tips.net site. It’s a treasure trove of information on those older versions of Word. Click here to see what I mean!

3 From the Comments: Cool TOA trick

One of the things I love most about doing this blog is what I learn from readers. People often chime in on the comments to suggest solutions to problems others are having or better ways of doing things.

One recent comment especially deserves its own spotlight.  Debbie Leonard Lovejoy stepped forward to help fellow commenter Ariel with a tricky formatting problem in a Table of Authorities. Specifically, this is what Ariel wanted:

I’ve searched high and low for a way to automatically format the cases in the TOA so the case name up to the comma is on a line by itself and then the reporter information and year and the page number are on a second, indented line, but no luck. I know I can manually do this just before printing by editing the table but I lose that formatting when the table updates and would like a more permanent solution if one exists. Strangest thing is that on the “Table of Authorities” dialog box, the example table in the Print Preview box has it formatted the way I’d like (though I imagine that is more a result of limited space in that box than some taunting and unavailable formatting option). Any idea? Thanks!

I had nothing. The only thing I could suggest was to “edit the right indent of the paragraphs to make them wrap a lot sooner than they would otherwise (in other words, not so close to the page number on the right margin).” Close (sort of), but no cigar.

Here’s Debbie’s much better solution:

Keep reading →

2 Guest Post @ Lawyerist: 5 Microsoft Office Hacks to Finish Tasks Faster

Want to move things from your inbox to your outbox a lot faster? It’s time you upgrade your skills in Microsoft Office to find faster ways of doing common tasks, like:

  • Speed-formatting your text with Styles (it’s a one-click operation!)
  • Using shortcut keys for speed typing
  • Employing templates to speed document creation for common forms
  • Accessing boilerplate text instantly with Quick Parts and AutoText
  • Getting one-click access to commonly used commands with the Quick Access Toolbar

Click here to get your learning on over at Lawyerist.

When a tab is not just a tab, part 3: Center tabs

Okay, show of hands: How many of you remember being taught how to center text in typing class? (Alright, hands down. Those of you who responded with “Typing class? What’s typing class?” have officially made me feel ancient.)

For you youngsters out there, here’s how it went down: All of us typing students rolled a sheet of paper through the platen (look it up, kiddies) of the typewriter and spaced over to the center of the page 4.25″ from each edge (using the tab key and space bar), calculated how many letters and spaces were in whatever phrase we wanted centered, divided by two, then backspaced from the center point by that many spaces.

Years later, it exhausts me just to describe it.

Fortunately, modern word processors like Microsoft Word make exercises like this obsolete. Oh, sure, you already know how to center text, right? But using center justification centers the text between the left and right margins. But what if you want to center text across another point on the page?

Answer: center tabs.

Keep reading →

Guest Post @ Lawyerist: Sharing AutoText and Quick Parts with Others

If you’ve started building a library of boilerplate text in Microsoft Word using either AutoText or Quick Parts, you may have wondered to yourself whether you can distribute those to your assistant/paralegal or other attorneys in your practice area at your firm.

In response to a request from a Lawyerist reader, I’ve not only unlocked the secrets behind where these entries are stored, I’ve also detailed a method for storing and distributing these entries for others to use.

Click here to read this illustrated article over at Lawyerist.

Guest Post @ Lawyerist: 3 Word Formatting Snafus … Solved!

A lot of Microsoft Word users (particularly those who are coming to Word from WordPerfect) tear their hair out over those seemingly unsolvable formatting issues. You know what I’m talking about: that really funky something that happens to your text that seems to defy logic, even considering you’re dealing with a software program.

Over at Lawyerist, I tackle three of those bugaboos: the horizontal line that suddenly appears in your text and that you can’t backspace over, pages that have large blank spaces at the bottom of them (despite the fact that you haven’t put a hard page break in there), and yellow (or blue or green or whatever) highlighted text that won’t go away no matter what you do.

If you’ve ever had one of these frustrating problems, click here for the solutions.

9 How to set tabs (without tearing your hair out)

It ought to be pretty simple, really. Even though Microsoft Word, by default, sets left tabs every half inch (at least in the U.S. version – elsewhere may vary), sometimes you need something different. Even if only for a particular part of your document. So, how on earth do you set tabs in Microsoft Word?

Keep reading →

Guest Post @ Lawyerist: Don’t Lose That File! Using Microsoft Word’s AutoRecover

It always seems to happen when you’re under the gun — the lights flicker or an application crashes, and your computer goes down right in the middle of a document. Or you get distracted and forget to save your document before you exit Microsoft Word.

You might not be able to stop computer crashes or inconvenient interruptions, but you can prevent losing an important document. In my post at Lawyerist, I show you not only how to take 30 seconds to set up Word’s AutoRecover feature, but also how to use it to recover a document that might otherwise be lost.

Click here for the full illustrated tutorial.

Weekly Roundup: Double-click shortcuts, the case of the missing ampersand, and more Office for iPad news

This week: Stop wandering around Microsoft Word’s Ribbon looking for commands and do some strategic double-clicking instead, why putting an ampersand in your Excel header or footer yields a weird result (and what to do if you really, really want that “&” to show up in your header or footer), and more news about an exciting iPad application that lets you edit Office documents. That’s right … it’s the Weekly Roundup!

Keep reading →

1 Weekly Roundup: Popular Word fixes, Excel row headers, and Office for iPad

Now that it’s past the annual holiday season here in the US (Santa brought me a way-big monitor!) it’s back in the saddle again for the Weekly Roundup. This week: Microsoft Office blog does its own list of most popular posts (including a couple of issues that continually plague legal Office users), a quick-and-dirty Excel tutorial on printing title rows, and an exciting rumor for iPad users.

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Weekly Roundup: Adobe’s way to archive old emails and good news for Ribbon-haters

For our Thanksgiving week Roundup: Adobe shows us how to print both entire batches and selected pdfs from an email portfolio (a great way to archive email for future reference), and if you hate the Microsoft Office Ribbon, you can get rid of it without downgrading your Office Suite.

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5 Reader Question: Underlining trailing spaces

Don’t you just hate it when you want Microsoft Word to do something really simple and obvious, like underline blank spaces, and it just refuses to do it? That’s the dilemma faced by reader who recently wrote me, really frustrated over a signature line:

From time to time, I am inserting a line for a signature block or for some other purpose and after clicking underline or using control u I get nothing but blank space. When I check the font dialog box it shows underline and the font color is black, what is the problem?

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4 Save those trees! Printing compressed copies of large documents

If your law office is like most of the ones I’ve seen, you’ve got a lot of paper. A ton of paper. Probably more paper than you know what to do with.

Even with all that document digitizing we’ve all been doing in recent years – scanning, e-filing, case management databases, etc. – law firms still do an awful lot of printing. Even so, all those calls for firms to “go paperless” are starting to gain traction.

That said, it’s still true: we do so love our paper. And even the most digital-savvy among us has to admit that hard copies have their advantages. It’s tough to choose.

But what if I said you could have your cake and eat it too? Print as many pages as you want and still use less paper? Keep reading →