Category Archives for "Word 2010"

Reader Question: Forcing TOC entries to wrap at a specific point

I received a message from a reader earlier this week that went something like this:

I have a question about table of contents. ... I just want to know if you can wrap table of contents entries in the table of contents so that if they're multi-line entries, [they end up with an] equal amount of text on each line. I know that there's the indenting but I don't know ... if that will work to get an equal amount of text on that, on different entries. So kind of complicated question for me.

It IS kind of a complicated question, because the answer depends on which method he used to create the TOC.

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1 Table of Contents: Everything You Ever Wanted to Know

One of the things I'm on a rant about these days is loooooong documents.  Complicated documents, like 20+ page contracts and appellate briefs and stuff like that.

Why?  Because they always seem to need special stuf inserted in them.  Like custom headers and footers.  And level-1 and level-2 and level-out-the-wazoo headings.  It's enough to make your head spin.

But if you've got mad skills and you plan your document right, a lot of this stuff becomes easier.  Like putting in a simple table of contents, for example.

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1 Print a document excerpt in Microsoft Word

A Legal Office Guru reader wondered how to print a document excerpt without having to figure out which page numbers to print.

Reader Question

[M]y project involves producing an employee handbook and policy and procedure manual .... [One] challenge I have with it is to be able to print just sections of the document without having to scroll through the document to identify page ranges.

There are several different ways to print a document excerpt. Let's look at the Print dialog:

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3 Reader Question: How to create reciprocal hyperlinks in Microsoft Word

A reader emailed me a question recently about how he could create reciprocal hyperlinks within his Word document:

Reader Question

Is there an easy way to make hyperlinks within Word reciprocal? What I want to do is click on a hyperlink to get to a location in the document and then be able to easily go back to where I started before using the hyperlink.

As I said in my reply to him, this is similar to the behavior in a Kindle book: when you click on a footnote number, it takes you to the footnote, and when you click on the footnote number inside the footnote, it takes you back to where you were in the book. The footnote numbers (both of them) are reciprocal hyperlinks; each takes you to the other location (demo below).

My initial response was to tell him this is a perfect place to use hyperlinked bookmarks and cross-references, because cross-references can be hyperlinked to take you back to the bookmark. Once I did a little experimenting, though, I discovered the "reciprocal" part of the hyperlink equation took a bit of finagling. So I did a little research and found there's more than one way to create a hyperlink within Word:

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1 Getting pleading paper numbering on all pages

Many of you practice in courts that require you to use a format called pleading paper. Those are you who are familiar with it are probably groaning right now. Those of you who don't probably will once you see this example:

Example of pleading paper format

Yeah. It's line numbers all the way down (like a court reporter's transcript). Plus, regardless of the format has 24, 25, 28 or 32 lines, the lines have to track exactly with the text. Pain. In. The. Rear.

But one student in my Create Your Own Pleading Paper course said her line numbers didn't appear on the second and subsequent pages. Puzzling, but I knew what was probably wrong. (Hint: it has to do with how headers/footers are set up.)

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Clearing all formatting from text

If you already have my Fast Formatting Fixes Guide, you've seen one of the "nuclear options" that I recommend clear all formatting is CTRL-SHIFT-N. I describe it as returning the selected text to Normal formatting (according to whatever the Normal Style for your document is). After all, that's what Microsoft says that command does.

However, some of you tell me it doesn't quite clear all formatting. In fact, it seems to work a bit randomly. In this tutorial, I'm going to show you why that is. I'll also show you how you can use CTRL-SHIFT-N in particular situations and a different command to substitute.

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2 Does your Table of Contents need a do-over?

My friend Karen called me in a panic. "Bryan's got this contract he's editing [read: recycling] for a client. He's added a new numbered paragraph, but it's not showing up in the Table of Contents."

So, since I can't always diagnose Word problems blind (I'm good, but I'm not THAT good), and I go to her desk and see something that looks a bit like this:

I suspect the document he was working with had been recycled over and over. He was just taking a contract that had worked pretty well for another client and customizing it for a new client.

How did I figure that out? One clue was the way his Table of Contents was constructed (look at those codes above). Another was that the paragraph numbering was completely manual - no automatic paragraph numbering at all.

So what had happened here is that, because he didn't know how the Table of Contents was originally constructed, he couldn't automatically add a new paragraph to the TOC.

So rather than reconstruct his entire TOC based on Styles (a newer, more flexible model) and automating his paragraph numbering, I sat down to help Karen get that paragraph added and renumber the following paragraphs (thank goodness, not that many).

And I was immediately flummoxed.

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7 How to clean up your Style Gallery … permanently

The Quick Styles area, a.k.a. Styles Gallery (Word 2016)

Have you ever noticed that long list running across the Home tab? That's called the Style Gallery. It's where all the Quick Styles (the most accessible Styles) are kept. (Those aren't the only Styles Word has. There are actually over 200 of them!)

But you may not necessarily want to use all of them, and some of them are just in the way. (Like, "No Spacing"? When am I going to use that?) That's the situation one reader found herself in.

Jennifer has been working her way through my Styles course and came across a recurring problem:

I've tried removing certain styles from the Style Gallery menu, but
they come back when I open a new document. Is there a trick I'm
missing?
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1 The 1 Styles setting you should avoid

I received an email "distress call" from a reader recently. She's trying to get started with Styles (YAY!), but she's having some difficulties (BOO!):

Thanks to you, I’ve been trying to work with Word Styles. I’ve been building my own for my style of writing and formatting, but I’ve encountered an irritating problem. If I do any direct formatting within a style—say italicize some of the paragraph, or, for one part, indent or don’t indent, when the style calls for the other—it changes the style itself. What am I doing wrong?

As I explained to her, it's not so much a question of her doing something wrong as it is a flaw in the way someone set up the Styles. Whether she did it herself or inherited the problem from someone else's document or template, it's an easy fix.

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10 The Document Assembly System Right Under Your Nose

Once you've pretty much mastered the basics of Word—you can create and open documents, you can format text, etc.—you may be wondering, "What's next?" Oh, sure, there are features you can't quite get your head around, tasks you wish Word could do (I'm looking at you, former WordPerfect users), things you wish were easier.

But surely there's more benefit to using a word processor than being able to directly edit the text after your first draft, right?

And yet that's how so many people use word processors in general and Microsoft Word in particular. Like a glorified typewriter.

Even if your document is pretty well-formatted (and doesn't commit some heinous sin like using the Tab key to force a hanging indent), it is possible to move beyond simply viewing a word processing document as a convenient way to edit something later.

Want proof? Here's a scenario for you: You're in the middle of creating a document, maybe some discovery answers (forgive me; I work in litigation, so that's where my brain goes automatically), and you know you're going to need a notarized acknowledgement for your client to swear that the answers are true and correct, blah, blah, blah, and to have his/her signature witnessed and sealed by an authority.

What do you do now? If you're like most of the people I've encountered in law offices, you start racking your brain for the last time you did one of these. Let's see, did we have to do one of these in that Jones v. Smith matter? Oh, yeah. So now you start combing through the document management system to find that prior example. You pull that document up, scroll down 20 pages to find the notary acknowledgement block, select it with your mouse, copy it, switch over to your document-in-progress, paste it, oops that messed up the formatting so you have to fix that, make sure you've pulled out the client-specific information and substituted the correct names, updated the date ...

How long did THAT exercise take you? Contrast that ... with this:

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6 How to autonumber exhibits with the SEQ field

A reader came to me recently with a dilemma: He needed to create a document that had lettered exhibits sprinkled throughout, in a format that looked like this:

Example of autonumbered exhibit reference using SEQ field

Okay, so far, so good. Autonumbering I can handle.

But here was his other requirement: He wanted to be able to generate a list of the exhibits at the end of the document (including the description of the exhibits as shown above) so his assistant would know what documents to gather and attach.

At first, I proposed making the list at the bottom of the document first, then cross-referencing within the document. But he countered that the exhibits within the document would be dynamic. In other words, he might be adding or subtracting exhibits within the document, so they needed to autonumber within the document itself.

That's another wrinkle.

I had to think about this one for a bit. It's not impossible (in fact, it's not even really all that hard), but it does require deploying several techniques:

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7 The 6 Best Reasons to Use Styles

(Note: this post was originally published July 16, 2015.)

I had a good conversation with Sam Glover on the Lawyerist podcast recently about stuff I wish lawyers knew about Microsoft Office. It was a chance to say some things about how well (read: badly) many law offices use Microsoft Office.

One of those items on my ideal law firm training agenda was Styles. Sam and I are pretty much in agreement on why Styles is an essential Word skill. It’s so baked in, you can’t possible NOT use Styles, but very few Word users in my experience really use that feature well.

That part of the conversation was going pretty well. Then, at around the 13:08 mark, Sam asked me, “What’s the number one reason that lawyers ought to use Styles?”

And I froze. Then I mumbled something about getting all your level-three headings to update all at once.

Disaster.

So, because I can do a do-over on my own blog, here are six reasons I think you really ought to up your Styles game sooner than later.

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18 Does Publish as PDF create monster PDFs?

Over at Attorney at Work, I recently began publishing a series of quick (i.e., less than 3 minutes) videos with Microsoft Office tips for lawyers. The second video in that series showed you how to insert the Publish as PDF command into the Quick Access Toolbar that sits just above/below the Ribbon for a one-click way to PDF any document.

I got some great feedback from that piece, including:

You’ve saved me over an hour already today!! Thanks!

Clearly, that’s someone who does a lot of PDFing! (Is that a verb?)

One reader, however, came back with a really interesting observation:

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2 Table of Authorities – The Ultimate Guide

It's the one legal profession-specific feature in Microsoft Word. And, judging from some of the requests I receive from my newsletter readers, it's also one of the most intimidating. It's the dreaded Table of Authorities.

(Cue: Scary music)

In my experience, few things strike more fear into the hearts of legal support staff than having to put out a brief with a Table of Authorities. (Close second: Table of Contents) I suspect the bad rap TOAs get has more to do with how seldom most people have to deal with them (and thus, how unfamiliar they are) than with any real complexity of the feature itself. In other words, you can do this. And I'm going to help you break this down, step-by-step, starting with marking your citations.

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3 The 4 Fastest Formatting Fixes I Know

Hands down, the biggest complaint I get is that Microsoft Word seems to have a mind of its own when it comes to formatting. People swear they did nothing more than breathe on their document, and things went completely wonky!

Of course, without actually standing over their shoulder and watching them work, it's really impossible for me to know exactly what happened. A lot of times, there's a pretty easy File > Options tweak that could prevent similar snafus from happening again. (And don't even get me started about why you need to learn to use Styles.)

But in my experience, most people aren't particularly interested in trying to figure out how it happened. They just want to fix it and move on.

So for that crowd, I've put together a two-minute video on the four fastest ways I know to basically nuke your formatting so you can start over. You can basically choose among these:

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19 Copying vertical columns of text in Word

If you've ever had information typed up like this:

Information typed in tabbed columns

... and only needed to copy the stuff out of one or two columns:

... then you'll love this tip.

Say, for example, you needed to just get the dollar amounts and the names and copy them someplace else.  If you've got a whole list of these, you might think you'll either have to type this up again, or copy-and-paste each piece of text separately.

Au contraire. Trust me, you'll love this trick!

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6 Referencing the previous paragraph number with SEQ

I've been trying to solve a personal problem for a long time.

No, this blog hasn't suddenly turned "confessional". No TMI here.

The problem I'm referring to is this:

See that "3" that's boxed in red above? That's my problem. I wouldn't say it's the bane of my existence, but it still bugs me.

You see, I do a lot of Answers to Complaints in my day job. And I don't know how you do it where you practice, but in our area, there are always sort of "catch all" paragraphs in the Complaint that we just answer with a standard "yeah, we're just going to repeat our answer to all the above paragraphs without actually repeating it" statement.

That paragraph in the answer always starts with a reference to Paragraph 1 and ends with a reference to the immediately preceding paragraph. And if I'm using automatic paragraph numbering, that ought to be a breeze, right? If those paragraph numbers are driven by fields (which is all automatic paragraph numbering is), then I should be able to calculate "current paragraph number minus 1". I've learned how to insert the current paragraph number into a paragraph. Why not the previous one?

Except ... no. At least not according to the Microsoft MVPs I spoke to:

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11 Why do lawyers resist document assembly?

This post was originally published in September, 2015.

If you have any interest at all in the intersection between technology and lawyering, you should really check out this week’s podcast over at Lawyerist, where Lawyerist’s Sam Glover interviews Dennis Kennedy of the Kennedy-Mighell Report. Some of the conversation goes where you’d expect—document review, artificial intelligence, technology versus offshoring, what really constitutes “lawyering”, etc.—but then around the 13:37 mark, the conversation turns to a subject near and dear to my heart; namely, document assembly (which Kennedy apparently has had extensive past experience with).

Although Sam’s not entirely convinced of its value (at one point protesting “I am perfectly capable of automating documents, but in my own practice, I almost never bothered, because it would have only saved me 30 seconds”), Dennis Kennedy responds with what I think are some critical insights: Keep reading →

Formatting Autocorrect Entries

Have I told you lately how much I appreciate you, reader? Seriously, if it wasn't for all of you, I wouldn't find out about all sorts of things in Microsoft Office.

Case in point: a reader contacted me a few weeks ago and asked me this:

We recently upgraded from Word 2007 to 2013. In 2007 I had set up an auto correct for the term Id. In 2013 I can’t get the AutoCorrect to underline the term. Any ideas? -- Sharon

Frankly, I never knew you could format AutoCorrect entries. So I took to the interwebs to investigate.

Sure enough, it's possible to teach AutoCorrect to correct both the spelling and formatting of an entry. But there's a trick to it.

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